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Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

4 edition of State of mountain agriculture in the Hindu Kush-Himalayas found in the catalog.

State of mountain agriculture in the Hindu Kush-Himalayas

Pradeep Man Tulachan

State of mountain agriculture in the Hindu Kush-Himalayas

a regional comparative analysis

by Pradeep Man Tulachan

  • 386 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development in Kathmandu, Nepal .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Hindu Kush-Himalayan Region.
    • Subjects:
    • Hill farming -- Hindu Kush-Himalayan Region.

    • Edition Notes

      Includes bibliographical references (p. 65-70).

      StatementPradeep M. Tulachan.
      ContributionsInternational Centre for Integrated Mountain Development.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsS604.3 T85 2001
      The Physical Object
      Pagination70 p. :
      Number of Pages70
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL3975253M
      ISBN 109291152781
      LC Control Number2001292651
      OCLC/WorldCa48056435

      Read more about As mountains melt, more cooperation in Hindu Kush Himalayan region needed on Business Standard. The mountains are warming at a greater speed, leading to a rapid melting of the glaciers that provide water to a fourth of the world's population.   Agriculture in upstream region is mostly subsistence and has high significance for food and nutritional security of the people living in the harsh mountain terrain. However, farmers across the mountain region of HKH gradually shifting towards subsistence to high value agriculture due to growing recognition of the products, market access.

      International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development Kathmandu, Nepal The Hindu Kush Himalayas and Climate Change David Molden Neera Shrestha Pradhan. Mountains Matter: Water‐Energy‐Food Nexus • Mountain systems – a global resource • Potential impacts on agriculture and ecosystems. Devi and Deva are Sanskrit terms found in Vedic literature around the 3rd millennium BCE. Deva is masculine, and the related feminine equivalent is devi. Monier-Williams translates it as "heavenly, divine, terrestrial things of high excellence, exalted, shining ones". Etymologically, the cognates of Devi are Latin dea and Greek thea. When capitalized, Devi or Mata refers to goddess as divine.

      Formation of Glacial Lakes in the Hindu Kush-Himalayas and GLOF Risk Assessment ii. Foreword. Director General International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development. Glaciers are believed to have persisted in the Hindu Kush-Himalayas since the last Ice .   Our analysis reveals that the Hindu Kush-Himalayan mountain systems play a significant role in agriculture and food security in South Asia through water supply, climate and wind regulation, groundwater recharge and in sustaining wetland ecosystems.


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State of mountain agriculture in the Hindu Kush-Himalayas by Pradeep Man Tulachan Download PDF EPUB FB2

Abstract In order to better understand the state of mountain agriculture, this article analyzes trends for 3 integral components of mountain farming systems—production of foodgrain crops, horticultural and cash crops, and livestock—using time series data published by national governments in 5 Hindu Kush-Himalayan (HKH) by: State of mountain agriculture in the Hindu Kush-Himalayas: a regional comparative analysis.

This study provides a broad, regional picture of the state of mountain agriculture across the Hindu Kush-Himalayas (HKH), based on an analysis of the empirical data obtained from government by: 3. The state of agriculture in the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region was studied by analysing trends in the production of 3 integral components of mountain farming systems: food grain crops (cereals), horticultural and cash crops, and livestock.

Time-series data, published by the national governments of Bhutan, China, India, Nepal and Pakistan, were by: 3. The Hindu Kush Dari: هندوکش / k ʊ ʃ, k uː ʃ /) is an kilometre-long ( mi) mountain range that stretches through Afghanistan, from its centre to Northern Pakistan and into Tajikistan.

It forms the western section of the Hindu Kush Himalayan Region (HKH) and is the westernmost extension of the Pamir Mountains, the Karakoram and the divides the valley of the Amu Countries: List, Afghanistan, China, Pakistan, Tajikistan.

The mountains of the Hindu Kush Himalayas (HKH) are abundant in natural resources. These unique landscapes provide valuable ecosystem goods and services to support livelihoods of more than billion people – directly and indirectly.

But the harsh terrain and lack of enabling institutional. The Hindu Kush Himalaya Assessment: Mountains, Climate Change, Sustainability and People Book January with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'.

This open access volume is the first comprehensive assessment of the Hindu Kush Himalaya (HKH) region. It comprises important scientific research on the social, economic, and environmental pillars of sustainable mountain development and will serve as a basis for evidence-based decision-making to safeguard the environment and advance people’s well-being.

About Hindu Kush-Himalayan region: The Hindu Kush-Himalayan region spans an area of more than million square kilometres in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal, and Pakistan.

The region stores more snow and ice than anywhere else in the world outside the polar regions, giving its name: ’The Third Pole‘.

Mountain Research and Development publishes research on topics related to mountains, mountain people and communities, and sustainable development in mountains.

State of Mountain Agriculture in the Hindu-Kush Himalayan Region: A Comparative Analysis. Biannual Report (an internal document). The Hindu Kush Himalayas are the freshwater towers of South Asia and parts of Southeast Asia.

Water originating from their snow, glaciers and rainfall feed the ten largest river systems in. Therefore, this symposium is a first of such kind of symposium, especially focusing on mountain forestry in Hindu Kush Himalayan region.

Forests cover of about 25% of the Hindu Kush Himalayas and provide vital ecosystem services. They provide timber and non-timber resources, that helps to sustain local livelihoods, ensure the provision.

State of Mountain Agriculture in the Hindu Kush-Himalayas. A Regional Comparative Analysis. Author(s) Tulachan, P.M.

Publisher: Kathmandu, Nepal.: International Centre for Integrated Development (ICIMOD) Publication year: Notes: Library holding:NP show all notes.

Abstract. After the observation of IPCC 4th assessment that the Himalayas are “data deficient” with regard to climate change, some progress has been made particularly in the areas of glacier shrinkage, snow cover change, glacial lake outburst flooding, river discharge, treeline advance, phenological shift, climate change mitigation and adaptations, and people’s perceptions.

A Multidimensional Poverty Measure for the Hindu Kush-Himalayas, Applied to Selected Districts in Nepal Article (PDF Available) in Mountain Research and Development 35(3) August mountain community.

Founded inICIMOD is based in Kathmandu, Nepal, and brings together a partnership of regional member countries, partner institutions, and donors with a commitment for development action to secure a better future for the people and environment of the Hindu Kush-Himalayas.

The primary objective of. This open access book provides a comprehensive assessment of the Hindu Kush Himalaya region, on social, economic and environmental level. It presents leading knowledge on sustainable mountain development and policy solutions to safeguard the environment and advance people’s well-being.

The Himalayas are often called the water towers of Asia because of the vast amount of water locked in the form of ice in thousands of glaciers there. But concerns relating to climate change have often put a question mark on future water availability from these glaciers.

Now a new study on ice thickness of glaciers has estimated that glaciers in the Hindu Kush Himalayas might contain 27 percent. Every year, on the full moon in August, Hindu and Buddhist pilgrims make the difficult trek to Gosaikunda Lake, a high altitude lake in Nepal’s Himalayas The sixth Sustainable Mountain Development Summit, held in Mizoram, focused on urban development, climate change and adaptation, and identifying the research gaps and needs of Indian.

Glaciers in the Hindu Kush Himalayan (HKH) region are projected to shrink by one-third by the end of the century even if average global temperature rise is held to within degrees Celsius above pre-Industrial Age levels, according to the authors of a new comprehensive report, The Hindu Kush Himalaya Assessment.

Glacier melt of that magnitude has widespread implications. THIS publication is a collection of papers on the state of market towns and their trends in some countries of the Hindu-Kush Himalayan region. The role market centres in small towns play in the urbanisation of the region, the consequent impact on livelihood, strategies for mountain development, issues of evolution and the status and trend of.

N. Chettri, E. Sharma, R. ThapaLong-term monitoring using transect and landscape approaches within the Hindu-Kush Himalayas. Pp Pp E. Sharma (Ed.), Proceedings of the International Mountain Biodiversity Conference. The Hindu Kush Himalayas (HKH) cover kms across eight countries namely Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, India, Myanmar, Nepal and Pakistan.

Commonly described as the “water towers for Asia” the HKH are the source of 10 major rivers including the mighty Ganges, Brahmaputra and the Indus that provide water, food, energy and.